Fairing on a Cruzbike. No, for the front; yes, for the rear. But wouldn’t you rather have an aero helmet?

From a customer:

On Thu, September 12, 2013 10:10 am, James L______ wrote:
Robert and Maria
The ADEM headrest has been wonderful.
I am riding almost 100 miles a week to and from work
I want to go the next step and get a fairing to improve efficiency.
Any recommendations

Hi James,

Your weekly mileage is fantastic!  Great job!

Fairing on a Cruzbike.

Fairing: front

I advise NOT using a front fairing on a Cruzbike.  (Front fairings work better on traditional, non-Cruzbike recumbents and trikes.)

Although I’ve read a few posts and have seen one photo on-line of people using front fairings on their Cruzbikes, I believe a front fairing is dangerous on a Cruzbike for two reasons: 1) front fairings are heavy and that weight is likely to negatively effect steering; and 2) front fairing are sail-like and they catch wind from your back, therefore wind gusts will cause the front wheel to turn in unexpected ways on a Cruzbike.

I’d also mention that, generally speaking, small front fairings — which would impact steering less — give very little aerodynamic benefit (a customer and I once did a series of tests to measure it).  The main benefit of the small front fairing is to keep your feet warm during the winter.  (And they do this well.)

Large front fairings (like the one from HP Velotechnik) — which would impact steering more — help keep you drier in the rain and warm in the winter (and for this, they are GREAT), and will give more aerodynamic benefit than a small fairing, but I haven’t measured this.  At any rate, it’s hardly worth the downside (on a Cruzbike).

So, I don’t recommend a front fairing on a Cruzbike.  However, you may be able to find posts on the Cruzbike forums of riders using a front fairing on a CB with success.  Also, while there have been rumors that John Tolhurst, the Cruzbike designer, once toyed with designs for a front fairing, it hasn’t been introduced.

Instead of using a front fairing, I suggest you experiment with a steeper recline of the seat.  This will give a significant and comparatively safe aerodynamic advantage.

Fairing: rear

A REAR fairing (a.k.a., tail box, tail sock, etc.) gives significant aerodynamic advantage without as much effect on steering.  (My customer and I measured this as well.)  TerraCycle sells a “Tail Sok” but you’re on your own in terms of figuring out how to attach it to a Quest (or any other Cruzbike).  If you figure it out, please tell me, because I like the TC Tail Sok!
http://t-cycle.com/tailsoks-c-10/?zenid=agq74v3s2s8enu193ef9pu8u85

An inexpensive and practical alternative to the rear fairing is an aerodynamic bag on the seat back or rack, such as those from Radical Design or Ortlieb.  This doesn’t give as much benefit as a rear fairing, but I’ve measured a benefit.

The easiest and cheapest way to improve your aerodynamics is with a time trial aerodynamic helmet which you’ve bought on sale.
http://www.racycles.com/apparel/performance-gear/helmets-aero

In a conversation, Maria Parker recommended using more aerodynamic clothing, such as a lycra race kit (a.k.a., roadie clothing, spandex, etc.).

I believe an aerodynamic wheelset helps a lot, but these can be expensive.

On that note, another inexpensive option is to look at the tires you’re using.  Schwalbe makes excellent race tires, that are also durable, and are available in 26″ sizes.  This isn’t to improve aerodynamics but to decrease rolling resistance.
http://www.schwalbetires.com/

If there’s a reader out there who has had a different experience, or would like to share a solution they have tested with great success, please post a note.

All best,
Robert
————
Robert Matson
New York City Recumbent Supply
The Innovation Works, Inc.
copyright 2013 Robert Matson

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